Urso Chappell is a San Francisco-based designer, writer, and consultant. Born on the former site of the 1904 World's Fair in St. Louis, he has attended nine expos thus far. In 1998, he founded ExpoMuseum.com. As a designer, he was the winner of Expo 2005's Linimo Design Contest in 2004. He has reported on various expos and consults for future expos and expo bids.

Expo 2015's Organizers Reveal a Hint of Things to Come

In 1999, 2004, 2009, and now 2014, I've had the opportunity to experience an Expo city within a year of its debut on the world stage. In all four cases (Hannover's Expo 2000, Aichi's Expo 2005, Shanghai's Expo 2010, and Milan's Expo 2015), you get the feeling that the city doesn't quite know what to expect just yet. In all four cases, much of what's going to happen in the next year is still a mystery. What is this big event that has been in the planning on construction stage for years?

One of the challenges for Expo organizers is communicating to the public what to expect. The organizers of Expo 2015 have taken the step of creating the Expo Gate, a preview center that's open to the public. The temporary landmark, created by Scandurra Studio, is situated just outside Sforzesco Castle, which was part of the site of the 1906 Universal Exposition. It will also serve as a ticket center, conveniently located in the center of town.

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Sending Your City to College

I'm often called upon to explain what world's fairs are and what kind of impact they can have on a city, a region, or a country. Here in North America, that can be a daunting task because generations have now grown up not having had the chance to experience a world's fair firsthand.

Not surprisingly, people focus on the economics of world's fairs. Do they make money?

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Emily Graslie on the 1893 Chicago World's Fair

Dubai Wins the Right to Host Expo 2020

Walt Disney and World's Fairs, Part 3

When writing parts 1 and 2 about the connections between Walt Disney, the company he founded, and world's fairs, I hadn't planned on writing a part 3, but apparently, the story won't end just yet.

Every world's fair since 1984 has had a mascot, a character designed to anthropomorphize the ideals of the expo and appeal to younger guests. As you might imagine, it's a challenging and rewarding task and the most successful mascots go on to embody the expo and its ideals long after the event's closing day.

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Walt Disney and World's Fairs, Part 2

Walt Disney's greatest contribution to the world of world's fairs was at an event that wasn't officially recognized by the BIE, but nonetheless has gone on to become an important celebration and beloved memory for many in the United States: the 1964-1965 New York World's Fair.

Because the 1964-1965 New York World's Fair wasn't officially recognized by the BIE, participation by foreign countries was greatly reduced. To remedy that gap in content, the organizers chose to rely on corporations and US states more than would typically be done. At the same time, Walt Disney was looking for opportunities to connect with American corporations and let them "foot the bill" for his own artistic and technological experimentation.

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Walt Disney and World's Fairs, Part 1

I’ve written before about how many Americans are unaware that expos (or “world’s fairs,” as we tend to call them here) still happen. Similarly, the millions of people who live in countries that have hosted expos in the last couple of decades are sometimes unaware of America’s contributions to the medium throughout history. Walt Disney’s story is emblematic about how 20th Century United States history and world’s fair history are intertwined.

I see it as part of my mission to keep world’s fairs and the United States from drifting apart. Fortunately, working at the Walt Disney Family Museum, I have the privilege of interacting regularly with other folks who are also passionate about the power of places.

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Torontonians Hope to End North America's World's Fair Drought in 2025

I've mentioned in this blog before that groups in Houston, San Francisco, and Minneapolis-St. Paul have looked at finding ways to get the United States back into the BIE so that cities can bid for Expo 2022, Expo 2023, or Expo 2025, but parallel efforts are also under way in Canada.

After Edmonton's bid efforts for 2017 were killed off by Canada's federal government, interests in Toronto, headed by City Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam, started looking at Expo 2025. Last year, those efforts seemed to have been killed by the Canadian federal government's decision to discontinue its membership in the BIE, but this month, it looks like there's a renewed push for Expo 2025 and an effort to keep Canada in the BIE.

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Vote for Expo 2017's Logo

The organizers of Expo 2017 in Astana, Kazakhstan are asking the public to vote for which of seven logos will be used to express the identity of Central Asia's first world's fair. Here are the seven choices.

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Filmmaker Jeffrey Ford asks “Where’s the Fair?”

In my last entry, I talked about the state of expos in the United States. It’s a difficult topic to address to an American audience since there are a number of big issues here. These issues include: the lack of US participation in two recent foreign expositions, the lower quality of the presentations that did happen, the lack of transparency behind those efforts, as well as the lack of any world’s fairs on US soil in nearly 30 years. This is made even more difficult because the vast majority of Americans are unaware that expos still exist. Many younger people have never even heard of the medium – no matter if you call them “expos" (as most of the world does) or “world’s fairs” (as most Americans do).

Filmmaker Jeffrey Ford started wondering a few years ago what ever happened to world’s fairs. They inspired generations and he began to wonder, after a chance purchase of old View-Master Reels, whatever happened to the medium. The film begins by documenting his own journey to answer his own question: What happened to the world’s fair?

 

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The Current State of Expos in the United States

I’ve spent a lifetime studying the history of world’s fairs and I’m often asked which expo is my favorite. It’s always been a difficult thing to answer, but in recent years, I realized there really has only been one answer. My favorite expo is always the next one. Living in the United States, that’s become a challenge as of late since we haven’t had a world’s fair in North America since 1986.

When I was just fifteen, growing up in Atlanta, I was fortunate to live just hours from Knoxville, Tennessee which hosted the Knoxville International Energy Exposition, better known locally as the 1982 World’s Fair. Two years later, I went to the 1984 Louisiana World Exposition in New Orleans. In college, I saved up money for a cheap flight to Vancouver, British Columbia in Canada to see Expo ’86. I was clearly hooked on expos at an early age.

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The World as We Want It: The Expo as Experiment

As a child, visiting relatives in St. Louis, Missouri here in the United States, I’d often hear references to the 1904 World’s Fair that was held there. Officially known as the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, Americans have tended to use the term “world’s fair” much in the same way that we refer to football as “soccer.”

I’d later find out that not only did my great-grandmother attend the world’s fair, but I discovered that the hospital I was born in was on land that was part of the site. For folks in St. Louis, the event is still an important part of the city’s identity. It not only helped St. Louis shape its identity, but pointed the way forward for the city and the nation.

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