Expo Blog

The Expo Blog is a space for posts on the history, themes, legacies and experience of Expos. It includes articles from the BIE and external contributors.

 

The Bureau International des Expositions (BIE) is the intergovernmental organization in charge of overseeing and regulating World Expos, International Specialized Expos, Horticultural Exhibitions and the Design Triennale di Milano.

Expo 2015 Milan site reopens to public with Triennale exhibition

Expo 2015 Milan site reopens to public with Triennale exhibition

Over six months after Expo 2015 Milano closed its gates and international participants lowered their flags, the Expo site partially reopened today to host a range of activities for the summer period. Residents and visitors alike are now able to access a 19-hectare area of the site for free, with the key attraction being the ‘City after the City’ exhibition series, which is part of the six-month XX1 Triennale di Milano design fair.

The area, which has been dubbed ‘Experience rESTATEaMilano’, includes the central part of the Expo site featuring the symbolic Tree of Life as well as the Palazzo Italia and the Lombardy pavilion. The zone is open between 3pm-11pm on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays between 27 May and 30 September.

Read More
1823 Hits

Zaragoza's Bridge Pavilion reopens to the public

Zaragoza's Bridge Pavilion reopens to the public

The long term architectural contribution of an Expo to the city in which it took place – its legacy – is of significant interest to residents and visitors to the city. Planning the physical legacy of the Expo as part of the transformation that it brings to the city is a prerequisite to hosting a successful Expo.

Zaragoza’s iconic Bridge Pavilion (Pabellón Puente), designed by Zaha Hadid for Expo 2008, is one such monument that continues to stand to this day. It reopened to the public on 6 May 2016 and will remain open until 6 November. The pedestrian bridge is open from Monday to Sunday from 10am to 2pm and from 5pm to 9pm.

Tags:
Read More
1313 Hits

The story behind the Palazzo dell’Arte

The story behind the Palazzo dell’Arte

As the home of the Triennale di Milano, the Palazzo dell’Arte is a permanent edifice to the Italian design tradition as well as its modern day hub. The Palazzo, which is also known as the Palazzo della Triennale or the Palazzo Bernocchi, features research centres, conference rooms, bookshops, theatres, restaurants and a bar. It is located at the heart of the Italian design scene in Parco Sempione in Milan.

The history of the Palazzo dell’Arte goes back to Italian senator and philanthropist Antonio Bernocchi, who was a leading figure in the Italian textile industry. The Bernocchi brothers’ company, Bernocchi SpA, commissioned the Luminator Bernocchi, an innovative lamp that was both a work of art and a practical solution to illuminate garments from above without burning the fabric. The Luminator, which was designed by Luciano Baldessari, was showcased in the Italian Pavilion at the 1929 World Expo in Barcelona, and its success as an object of industrial design inspired the idea behind the establishment of a museum dedicated to design as well as art.

Read More
1507 Hits

The King at Seattle’s World Fair

The King at Seattle’s World Fair

If the Century 21 Exposition, which took place in Seattle in 1962, was mainly aimed at promoting American scientific research and its leadership in spatial exploration, it was also the place for the shooting of a musical produced by Metro Goldwyn Mayer headlined by the famous actor and singer Elvis Presley. The plot of "It happened at the World's Fair" produced by Norman Taurog, takes place on the Seattle World Fair's site in a scenery which is both futuristic and very representative of the American 60's society. We follow the adventures of two friends, Danny and Mike, who decide to go to the World's Fair to find a job because of their debts.

The film crew arrived in Seattle on 5th September 1962, when the Expo had already been in full swing for five months. This date was not chosen randomly because it was precisely the start of the school year. The director wanted to avoid as much as possible scenes of massive hysteria caused by teenage fans of the "King". Unfortunately for him, young people from around tried by all means to come closer to their idol. Actually, there are numerous stories from fans: series of fainting, snatches of conversation with Elvis, or, for Sue Waters, an 18 year old lucky girl, four dates with the King.

Tags:
Read More
1370 Hits
Opinions given by external contributors to the Expo Blog do not necessarily reflect the views and position of the BIE